Tag Archives: computer based training

Right Tool for the Job

I see lots of articles on LinkedIn and various blogs about how some methods used in workplace safety management are of no value, or worse, these tools are straight from Hell itself. I’ve read that things such as BBS (Behavior Based Safety), measuring safety performance, or computer based training (CBT/WBT) are not to be used by the right-thinking safety professional. Some safety professionals are saying that these methods are “snake oil” and those that promote the use of these methods are con artists. But I think we may be looking at these methods incorrectly.

My father was a carpenter and he had this massive tool box that went with him on most jobs. It was like the rolling, multi-drawer metal toolboxes you might see today at an auto repair shop, except his was made of wood and he built it himself. He had literally hundreds of tools in the drawers of that toolbox, and each had specific functions. I can’t imagine one of his co-workers saying to him “I don’t know why you keep that #3 Phillips screwdriver in your toolbox; it doesn’t work on a #2 Phillips screw”, or “Why do you have that cross-cut saw? It can’t be used in cutting out a pattern”. It’s really no different when we talk about the various methods, or tools, used in workplace safety management. BBS, CBT, measuring safety performance…these are all just tools that are available. And they don’t work when used for the wrong job.

For example, trying to implement BBS in a place where the organizational culture is one of fear and mistrust would not be effective: in fact, it could be quite harmful to the organization. Additionally, thinking that BBS is the ONLY method to use for safety performance improvement could also be harmful to the organization. BBS is a tool, but it does not focus on identifying and correcting hazards, whereas another tool such as Safety Management Systems do focus on hazards. BBS could be used as a tool in providing an opportunity to perform tasks safely, and then coach individuals on what was observed and discuss decision making in job performance. But if BBS is used to “catch” people or to place blame, individuals involved might be perceived as “safety cops”, not something that is seen in a positive light in most organizations. BBS is just a tool that has correct and incorrect uses.

Another error we might make is measuring safety performance by just looking at injury numbers; this does not tell you what is and is not working in your safety system. Proper use of safety metrics can drive performance toward more efficient use of resources, improved compliance and profitability, and improved general health and well-being of an organization and its workers. But metrics in themselves will not achieve excellence. They do, however, provide a “window” through which management can see the effectiveness of their systems. Injury rates, a lagging indicator, are a measure of our failure, but we can use leading indicators to focus on future safety performance, not the past. Some examples of leading indicators include:
• Perception surveys
• Findings from Safety Audits/Inspections
• Behavior Observation Data
• Number of Job Hazard Analysis (JHAs) performed
• Percent of corrective actions completed
• Number of Lock-out/Tag-out procedures reviewed each year
• Percentage of purchasing contracts that include safety requirements.
• Average time to act on safety suggestions.
• Percentage of funds allocated for safety suggestions

Safety performance measurement is just a tool that has correct and incorrect uses.

Some authors and safety professionals would have you believe that using CBT for safety training will damage your organization’s safety culture. When it comes to training our employees, we need to realize that using CBT as the ONLY delivery method for all of our training will not result in an effective transfer of knowledge and skills. But to use a blanket statement like “CBT is Bad For Your Safety Culture” does a great disservice to a tremendous learning tool and may steer employers away from something that can improve their safety culture, not destroy it. CBT was never meant to replace all classroom training. Some subjects require a significant amount of hands-on training and need to be delivered via classroom, lab, or on-the-job training. But this does not mean that CBT can’t be effectively used to cover some of the details that would normally be covered in classroom lecture format. CBT is just a tool that has correct and incorrect uses.

This was a discussion of just a few of the many safety improvement tools, each that can be used correctly or incorrectly. As safety professionals, we have a variety of tools available to us today to help ensure the safest workplace possible. Why limit ourselves by refusing to keep our toolbox full of these tools? It all boils down to using what works. No one system, process, or theory has all of the answers. The key is in selecting the right tool for the job.

If you would like to learn more about some of the many tools we have to choose from, please check out some of my live and recorded audio conferences:

Behavior Based Safety: What Works, What Doesn’t, and How It Can Help Your Organization: http://www.theindustrycalendar.com/showWCDetails.asp?TCID=1014275&RID=1011610

How to Use and Understand Safety Metrics: http://www.theindustrycalendar.com/showWCDetails.asp?TCID=1014502&RID=1011610

How to Develop and Conduct Safety Training: http://www.theindustrycalendar.com/showWCDetails.asp?TCID=1015035&RID=1011610

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Computer Based Training (CBT) is NOT Bad For Your Safety Culture

Some authors and safety professionals would have you believe that using CBT for safety training will damage your organization’s safety culture.  These folks will tell you that CBT isolates workers and that it does not permit interaction like one would see in classroom training, and that it eliminates discussion and collaboration among employees.

First, I think it’s important that we understand what CBT is and what it is not. CBT is one of the tools we find in what is called Distance Learning (or also known as E-Learning).  Distance Learning uses other delivery formats as well, including instructor-led, web-delivered courses that can include a great deal of participant discussion and interaction. Even self-paced CBT or WBT can include a good deal of interaction and allow for discussion.  It’s all about how the training is designed. To use a blanket statement like “CBT is Bad For Your Safety Culture” does a great disservice to a tremendous learning tool and may steer employers away from something that can improve their safety culture, not destroy it.

When a training course is designed and developed properly, it will include the ability for participants to learn and share best practices and to get real questions answered about how the training can be applied in the workplace. CBT is only a lonely process when it is not developed properly or if it is meant to not include interaction between participants and between participants and instructor.

Some CBT courses are designed as performance support tools or to augment instructor-led classroom training before and/or after a live training event.  These types of CBT would not normally include ways for participants to interact with each other or the instructor (other than via an email link). CBT of this sort is designed to deliver the same type of information that might be delivered in a lecture format. But it is delivered at a much lower cost and with convenience for the participant. But it is not intended to be a stand-alone solution.

CBT was never meant to replace all classroom training. Some subjects require a significant amount of hands-on training and need to be delivered via classroom or lab training. But this does not mean that CBT can’t be effectively used to cover some of the details that would normally be covered in classroom lecture format.

Even OSHA sees the value in CBT to cover certain parts of a safety training course. When used judiciously, CBT can deliver lecture-type information before a student attends a classroom event and can also be used after the classroom course to reinforce learning. And when used with other Distance Learning tools, the training can be just as interactive with participants working together and asking questions as one might see in classroom training.

Proper use of CBT is a good decision for any organization. Designed properly, with good use of controls over testing and knowledge assessment, CBT is the right choice to augment your instructor-led classroom safety training courses.

Safety education occurs through use of policies, procedures, and manuals. It occurs in meetings, email notes, performance evaluations, casual conversations, and on-the-job demonstrations. There are lots of delivery methods we can and should use for safety training. CBT is one of them, and using it as part of the entire safety education program is not bad for your safety culture.

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